Tag Archives: education

William Holmes McGuffey’s First Eclectic Reader

“McGuffey is remembered as a conservative theological teacher. He interpreted the goals of public schooling in terms of moral and spiritual education, and attempted to give schools a curriculum that would instill Presbyterian Calvinist beliefs and manners in their students. While these goals were considered suitable for the relatively homogeneous America of the early-to-mid-19th century, they were less so for the increasingly pluralistic society that developed in the late 19th century and early 20th century. The content of the readers changed drastically between McGuffey’s 1836-1837 edition and the 1879 edition. The revised Readers were compiled to meet the needs of national unity and the dream of an American melting pot for the world’s oppressed masses. The Calvinist values of salvation, righteousness, and piety, so prominent in the early Readers, were excluded from the later versions. The content of the books was secularized and replaced by middle-class civil religion, morality and values. McGuffey’s name was featured on these revised editions, yet he neither contributed to them nor approved their content.”

Homeschooling and Socialization

“Compared to children attending conventional schools, however, research suggest that they [homeschooled children] have higher quality friendships and better relationships with their parents and other adults. They are happy, optimistic, and satisfied with their lives. Their moral reasoning is at least as advanced as that of other children, and they may be more likely to act unselfishly. As adolescents, they have a strong sense of social responsibility and exhibit less emotional turmoil and problem behaviors than their peers. Those who go on to college are socially involved and open to new experiences. Adults who were homeschooled as children are civically engaged and functioning competently in every way measured so far. An alarmist view of homeschooling, therefore, is not supported by empirical research.”

Richard G. Medlin, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology at Stetson University

http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/faculty/pje/pje_volume_88_issue_3_2013/medlin.php

Our Humanist Heritage

“Every child in America entering school at the age of five is mentally ill because he comes to school with certain allegiances to our founding fathers, toward our elected officials, toward his parents, toward a belief in a supernatural being, and toward the sovereignty of this nation as a separate entity. It’s up to you as teachers to make all these sick children well by creating the international child of the future.”

-Chester M. Pierce, Humanist, Harvard psychiatrist, speaking as an expert in public education at the 1973 International Education Seminar.

“Professor Pierce believes and alleges that a child who believes in God is mentally ill and should be ‘cured’ by teachers. Harvard was the first college founded in America. The main goal of the founders of Harvard is expressed by the words ‘VERITAS CHRISTO ET ECCLESIAE’ on its official university seal, which mean ‘Truth for Christ and the church.” It seems Pierce believes that the founders of Harvard were mentally ill, too.
“Harvard’s 1636 rules declared:
Let every student be plainly instructed and earnestly pressed to consider well the main end of his life and studies is to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal life and therefore lay Christ in the bottom as the only foundation of all sound knowledge and learning…”

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=7Flr42QKyw0C&pg=PA243&lpg=PA243&dq#v=onepage&q&f=false